CAR OVERVIEW

In 1968, Ferrari saw it fit to replace the four-year-old 275 GTB/4 and the 365 the GTB/4 was introduced and Ferrari enthusiasts took it upon themselves to dub it the Daytona in honour of Ferrari's 24 Hours of Daytona win. The nickname was so popular that the GTB/4 became almost more noticeable under its nickname than its given name. The 365 GTB/4 Berlinetta, that replaced the earlier 275 GTB/4, differed dramatically in styling, though the tubular steel chassis bore many similarities to its predecessor and provided superior balance. Where the curvaceous 275 GTB/4 was clearly a traditional Pininfarina design, the 365 GTB/4 was at once modern, edgy, sleek and forward-looking. Penned by Pininfarina's Leonardo Fioravanti the 365 GTB/4 features a number of styling cues that continue to influence modern Ferrari design. The outgoing 275 GTB/4 lent the basic design of its 60-degree V-12 engine to the 365 GTB/4, though it was enlarged from 3.3 to 4.4 litres or 4,390 cc. Power output rose accordingly. The new engine, designated Tipo 251, delivered 352 bhp and 315 foot-pounds of torque at 7,500 rpm through six Weber twin-choke carburettors. A five-speed manual transaxle was, of course, the only available transmission. The 365 was one of the final Ferraris to be 100 percent hand built. The entire main structure of the body was made from steel that was painstakingly hammer formed to perfection. Ferrari debuted the new model at the October 1968 Paris Salon. A handful of coupes were produced for customers in the 1968 model year. At the Frankfurt International Auto Show in September 1969, Ferrari unveiled a Spyder version of the car. Unsurprisingly, the seductive drop-top enjoyed critical acclaim that continues unabated today. The Frankfurt prototype show car was the only Spyder to be fitted with Perspex headlamps; all subsequent production models utilised retractable headlamps. Production of the Spyder and Berlinetta continued through 1973 before being replaced with the mid-engine 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer. Only 122 Daytona Spyders were built (including the sole "Plexiglass" headlight prototype) and most were delivered to the sunny comate states of the USA. This example is a factory produced item and one of 122 built. It was first supplied in the late summer of 1971 to Bill Harrah as an addition to his world famous private car collection located in Nevada. In 1976 with just 2,509 Miles covered, Harrah sold the car to Dr. Jack Frost, another fastidious car collector with over 50 cars in his possession. Frost kept the car for a remarkable 31 years until his passing during which time it was used sparingly, but was equally well known for entering Concours events and featured in numerous publications. When not being driven, the car was stored in Frost's climate controlled warehouse. In 2008 after Dr. Frosts passing the car was subsequently sold to its third owner with approximately 3,700 Miles showing on its odometer and remarkably still sporting factory-fitted Michelin XWX tyres. At this point it received a sympathetic recommission to ensure it drove with full roadworthiness, and in 2009 the car was granted Classiche Certification. The decision was then made to sympathetically yet comprehensively restore the car to Concours condition and at the same time refinishing the cars paint and trim in the stunning combination it is presented in today of Nero over a Rosso Hide interior. Accompanied by its original service book, Classiche Certification, history file, Autovettura book and with just 4,670 original and accounted for miles on the clock, this represents an extraordinary opportunity to own what must be one of the finest Daytona Spyders in existence. Cars such as this do not come around often and DK Engineering are delighted to be able to offer this iconic motorcar for sale.

DK Engineering

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